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Click on a pin on the map to see more information. Contacts: Laura M Bexfield Attribution: Water Resources Date published: February 27, 2019 Sediment cores let us look back in time at the contaminant history of a watershed. Contacts: Peter C Van Metre Attribution: Water Resources Date published: September 17, 2018 Stream, river, and lake bed sediment are reservoirs for many contaminants.

Contacts: Barbara Mahler Attribution: Water Resources, National Water Quality Program Date published: September 17, 2018 Who lives in your stream. Contacts: Daren M Carlisle, Ph. Attribution: Water Resources, National Water Quality Program Date published: November 13, 2017 Mercury contamination is a serious issue that impacts both ecosystem and human health on a global scale. Contacts: Collin Eagles-Smith Attribution: Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center Date published: November 13, 2017 The distribution and occurrence of contaminants and the associated biological exposure in ecological systems are driven by complex interactions between contaminant sources and mobilization pathways that are overlaid upon the habitat requirements of at-risk organisms.

Contacts: Collin Eagles-Smith Attribution: Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center Access USGS reports and publications on mercury and water quality. Year Published: 1995 Mercury contamination of aquatic ecosystems Mercury has been well known as an environmental pollutant for several decades. Attribution: Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center, Upper Midwest Water Science Center, Water Resources, Ecosystems, Toxic Substances Hydrology, Environmental Health Program View Citation Mercury Contamination of Aquatic Ecosystems; 1995; FS; 216-95; Krabbenhoft, David P.

Attribution: New England Water Science Center, New York Water Science Center, Oklahoma-Texas Water Science Center, Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center, Upper Midwest Water Science Center, Water Resources, Toxic Substances Hydrology, Region 6: Arkansas-Rio Grande-Texas-Gulf, Region 4: Mississippi Basin, Region 1: North Atlantic-Appalachian View Citation Janssen SE, Riva-Murray K, DeWild JF, Ogorek JM, Tate MT, Van Metre PC, et al.

Chemical and Physical Controls on Mercury Source Signatures in Stream Fish from the Northeastern United States. Attribution: Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Water Science Center View Citation Risch, M.

Attribution: Minnesota Water Science Center, Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center, Upper Midwest Water Science Center, Water Resources View Citation Christensen, V. Year Published: 2015 Optimizing fish sampling for fish - mercury bioaccumulation factors Fish Bioaccumulation Factors (BAFs; ratios of mercury (Hg) in fish (Hgfish) and water (Hgwater)) are used to develop Total Maximum Daily Load and water quality criteria for Hg-impaired waters.

Scudder Eikenberry, Barbara C. Attribution: South Atlantic Water Science Center (SAWSC), Water Resources, Ecosystems, Toxic Substances Hydrology, Environmental Health Program, Region 2: South Atlantic-Gulf (Includes Puerto Rico and the U. Virgin Islands) View Citation Scudder Eikenberry, BC, K Riva-Murray, CD Knightes, CA Journey, LC Chasar, ME Brigham, PM Bradley. Year Published: 2014 Mercury and methylmercury stream concentrations in a Coastal Plain watershed: A multi-scale simulation analysis Mercury is a ubiquitous global environmental toxicant responsible for most US fish advisories.

Virgin Islands) View Citation Knightes, CD, HE Golden, CA Journey, GM Davis, PA Conrads, M Marvin-DiPasquale, ME Brigham, and PM Bradley. Mercury and methylmercury stream concentrations in a Coastal Plain watershed: A multi-scale simulation analysis. Attribution: New England Water Science Center, Water Resources, Ecosystems, Toxic Substances Hydrology, Environmental Health Program, Region 1: North Atlantic-Appalachian View Citation Chalmers, A. Effects of urbanization on mercury deposition and accumulation in New England, Environ.

Year Published: 2014 An empirical approach to modeling methylmercury concentrations in an Adirondack stream watershed Inverse empirical models can inform and improve more complex process-based models by quantifying the principal factors that control water quality variation. Attribution: Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, Ecosystems, Contaminant Biology, Environmental Health Program View Citation Mercury bioaccumulation in estuarine wetland fishes: evaluating habitats and risk to coastal wildlife; 2014; Article; Journal; Environmental Pollution; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.

Year Published: 2014 Methylmercury-induced changes in gene transcription associated with neuroendocrine disruption in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) Methyl-mercury (MeHg) is a potent neuroendocrine disruptor that impairs reproductive processes in fish.

Attribution: Columbia Environmental Research Center, Ecosystems, Contaminant Biology, Environmental Health Program, Region 4: Mississippi Basin View Citation Methylmercury-induced changes in gene transcription associated with neuroendocrine disruption in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides); 2014; Article; Journal; General and Comparative Endocrinology; Richter, Catherine A. Virgin IslandsUtahVermontVirginiaWashingtonWest VirginiaWisconsinWyoming Year Select Year2018201920202021202220232024 Sort by Original Sort A to Z Z to A Apply Filter Reset Date published: February 2, 2018 A new "fingerprinting" tool, developed by USGS and collaborators at University of Wisconsin-Madison, can now indicate sources of mercury.

Attribution: Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Cost Center Use the links below to explore multimedia items associated with USGS research on mercury and water quality.

Attribution: Contaminant Biology, Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center April 20, 2018 Diagram of the Mercury Cycle June 30, 2016 Wetlands are hotspots for mercury methylation and export of methylmercury to aquatic foodwebs.

Rice is the most abundant wetland type in California and globally in temperate and tropical latitudes. Physical, chemical and biological Hg transformations are temporally pulsed in agricultural wetlands, due largely to seasonal water management practices.

May 7, 2016 Dave Krabbenhoft discusses the history of his 28-year career at the USGS. Attribution: Astrogeology Science Center March 31, 2011 Frozen fish samples awaiting mercury analysis Attribution: Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center January 14, 2011 Gold pan with more than 30 grams of mercury from 1 kilogram of mercury-contaminated sediments collected in a drainage tunnel.

Attribution: Mineral Resources Program, Geology, Geophysics, and Geochemistry Science Center Collecting fish samples for NAWQA Mercury in Stream Ecosystems Collecting fish samples for the NAWQA Mercury in Stream Ecosystems study, Nebraska. Attribution: California Water Science Center Use the links below to find news stories on USGS research on mercury and water quality. Date published: August 20, 2019 Isotopes of mercury in fish can indicate the source of that mercury, reports a new study from the USGS Regional Stream Quality Assessment.

Virgin IslandsUtahVermontVirginiaWashingtonWest VirginiaWisconsinWyoming Year Select Year2018201920202021202220232024 Sort by Original Sort A to Z Z to A Apply Filter Reset Date published: September 7, 2018 Mercury is a widespread pollutant that poses health risks to humans and wildlife at a global scale.

Attribution: Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center Date published: February 16, 2018 USGS author Collin Eagles-Smith led an invited synthesis paper as part of the plenary effort for the 13th International Conference on Mercury as a Global Contaminant. Attribution: Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center Date published: September 14, 2016 Mercury contamination is widespread, at various levels across western North America in air, soil, sediment, plants, fish and wildlife.

Attribution: Ecosystems, Contaminant Biology, Environmental Health Program, Alaska Science Center, Colorado Water Science Center, Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, Minnesota Water Science Center, Oregon Water Science Center, Oklahoma-Texas Water Science Center, California Water Science Center, Upper Midwest Water Science Center Date published: May 6, 2016 The first topographic map of Mercury was released today by the U.

Attribution: Natural Hazards, Astrogeology Science Center Date published: February 3, 2016 WI WSC scientist Dave Krabbenhoft met with staff of the House Natural Resources Committee on Jan. Attribution: Upper Midwest Water Science Center Date published: April 16, 2014 Mercury has been discovered in fish in some of the most remote national park lakes and streams in the western United States and Alaska.

Date published: August 2, 2011 Fallen autumn leaves transfer as much, if not more, hazardous mercury from the atmosphere to the environment as does precipitation each year, according to recent U. Date published: June 21, 2010 A recent U. Date published: December 1, 2009 Riverbank and floodplain soils are the major source of mercury in fish from several Shenandoah Valley rivers.

Attribution: Date published: December 19, 2007 Fish tissue samples taken from rainbow trout collected from four Idaho and Nevada reservoirs revealed elevated concentrations of methylmercury, according to data released by the U. Department of the Interior DOI Inspector General White House E-Gov USA. Fish and shellfish contain high-quality protein and other essential nutrients, are low in saturated fat, and contain omega-3 fatty acids.

So, women and young children in particular should include fish or shellfish in their diets due to the many nutritional benefits. However, nearly all fish and shellfish contain traces of mercury. For most people, the risk from mercury by eating fish and shellfish is not a health concern. The risks from mercury in fish and shellfish depend on the amount of fish and shellfish eaten and the levels of mercury in the fish and shellfish.

Therefore, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are advising women who may become pregnant, pregnant women, nursing mothers, and young children to avoid some types of fish and eat fish and shellfish that are lower in mercury.

By following these 3 recommendations for selecting and eating fish or shellfish, women and young children will receive the benefits of eating fish and shellfish and be confident that they have reduced their exposure to the harmful effects of mercury. Do not eat Shark, Swordfish, King Mackerel, or Tilefish because they contain high levels of mercury.

Eat up to 12 ounces (2 average meals) a week of a variety of fish and shellfish that are lower in mercury. Check local advisories about the safety of fish caught by family and friends in your local lakes, rivers, and coastal areas.

Follow these same recommendations when feeding fish and shellfish to your young child, but serve smaller portions. What is mercury and methylmercury. Is there methylmercury in all fish and shellfish. What should I do. What about fish sticks and fast food sandwiches.